Newly Published: Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras In Focus!

Summary & Links to

PATANJALI’S YOGA SUTRAS IN FOCUS:
A Comparison of 40 Versions with Commentary
by Kilaya Ciriello

BOOK ONE

1. Now, the teaching of Yoga!
atha yogānuśāsanam

2. Yoga is a process that stills the mind.
yogaś citta-vrtti-nirodhah

3. In Yoga,
the seer becomes established
in his or her own essential nature.
tadā drastuh svarūpe ‘vasthānam

4. Outside of Yoga,
the seer is caught up and identified with
fluctuating thoughts and perceptions.
vrtti-sārūpyam itaratra

5. There are five basic types of fluctuating thought,
any of which are capable
of causing either joy or pain.
vrttaya pañcatayyah klistā aklistāś ca

6. The five types of fluctuating thoughts are
“pramāna,” “viparyaya,”
“vikalpa,” “nidrā,” and “smrti.”
pramāna-viparyaya-vikalpa-nidrā-smrtayah

7. Correct thoughts, “pramāna,”
come from either your own direct and accurate perception,
accurate logical inference (reasoning)
or the testimony of a trustworthy source.
pratyaksānumānāgamāh pramānāni

8. Wrong thoughts (“viparyaya”) occur when an idea about something
doesn’t match
what the object actually is.
viparyayo mithyājñānam atad-rūpa-pratistham

9. Imagination (“vikalpa”) is a thought
that is based on a mental image
describable by words
but not based on an object directly observable.
śabda-jñānānupāti vastu-śūnyo vikalpah

10. Deep sleep (“nidrā”) is a mental fluctuation
that is characterized by the absence of superficial thoughts.
abhāva-pratyayālambanā vrttir nidrā

11. When thoughts created through an experience
return to mind after the experience has ended
that is memory (“smrti”).
anubhūta-vishayāsampramoshah smrtih

12. In order for mental fluctuations to disappear, a diligent persistent practice (“abhyāsa”)
combined with a detached attitude (“vairāgya”)
must be developed and sustained.
abhyāsa- vairāgyābhyām tan-nirodhah

13. “Abhyāsa” is an unrelenting determination expressed in maximum effort
in order to reach the stability of a state free of mental fluctuations.
tatra sthitau yatno ‘bhyāsah

14. This practice (“abhyāsa”) must
be maintained with vigor and sincerity
over a prolonged period of time without interruption
so that it becomes solid and established.
sa tu dírgha-kāla-nairantarya-satkārāsevito drdha-bhūmih

15. “Vairāgya” is a state of mastery over all desires
for things seen or heard about.
drshtānuśravika-vishayā-vitrsnasya vaśíkāra-sañjñā vairāgyam

16. “Vairāgya” is perfected when one realizes one’s identity
with the inner witness (“purusha-khyāti”)
and a freedom from attachment
to all of Nature (the “guna-s”) results.
tat param purusha-khyāter guna-vaitrshnyam

17. The initial stages of the process of stilling the mind
are called “with knowledge” (“samprajñā”)
because an awareness of the gross and subtle aspects of objects
is retained.
This is accompanied with feelings of joy
and is grounded in the idea of existing.
vitarkā-vicārānandāsmitā-rūpānugamāt samprajñātah

18. As stillness of the mind deepens with continued practice, knowledge of the gross and subtle aspects of reality fall away, leaving only the residue (“sanskāra”) of knowing, itself.
virāma-pratyayābhyāsa-pūrvah sanskāra-śesho ‘nyah

19. This state of stillness is the same
as experienced by both disembodied souls
and souls who are emerging from the unmanifest,
waiting for bodies.
bhava-pratyayo videha-prakriti-layānām

20. For the embodied yogi, however,
this state of stillness
is the direct result of progressively attaining
faith, vigor, a concentrated mind,
“samādhi” and finally, ultimate wisdom.
śraddhā-vírya-smrti-samādhi-prajñā-pūrvaka itareshām

21. The goal of yoga is not far
for those who practice with piercing intensity.
tívra-samvegānām āsannah

22. Practice in yoga bears fruit
respective of its intensity:
mild, moderate or intense.
mrdu-madhyādhimātratvāt tato ‘pi viśesha

23. Devotion to the Divine (“Īśvara”)
is also effective in stilling the mind,
taking into account the degree of intensity
with which it is pursued.
íśvara-pranidhānād vā

24 “Íśvara” is a direct manifestation of the “purusha,”
is not bound by “karma”
and is not affected by the “kleśa-s.”
kleśa-karma-vipākāśayair aparāmrstah purusha-viśesha íśvarah

25. In “Īśvara” lies the unsurpassable seed
of all knowledge.
tatra niratiśayam sarvajñatva-bíjam

26. “Īśvara” was the guru of the first gurus,
being beyond the limits of time.
sa pūrveshām api guruh kālenānavacchedāt

27. “Īśvara-s” name is the exultation of His/Her greatness
(the “pranava” mantra).
tasya vācakah pranavah

28. Repeating the “pranava”
leads to absorption into its meaning.
taj-japas tad-artha-bhāvanam

29. Repetition of the “pranava” mantra
destroys all obstacles
and turns consciousness inward.
tatah pratyak-cetanādhigamo ‘pyantarāyābhāvaś ca

30. Sickness, apathy, indecision,
heedlessness (lack of mental focus to do the work),
laziness, lust, wrong ideas, fall from a desired state
and the inability to maintain a desired state
can all agitate or distract the mind
and so, can impede progress with yoga (are “vikshepā-s”).
vyādhi-styāna-sanśaya-pramādālasyāvirati-bhrānti-darśanālabdha-bhūmikatvānavasthitatvāni citta-vikshepās te ‘ntarāyāh

31. Pain, dejection, physical trembling,
unconscious breathing and excited breathing
are the effects of these disruptions.
duhkha-daurmanasyāngam-ejayatva-śvāsā-praśvāsā vikshepa-sahabhuvah

32. The yogi can avoid or quell these problematic states
by steadily applying one antidote
when the obstacle arises.
tat-pratishedhārtham eka-tattvābhyāsah

33. Upon encountering others who are experiencing happiness we should respond with friendliness.
Upon encountering others who are experiencing sorrow we should respond with compassion.
Upon encountering others who are doing good deeds we should respond with celebration.
Upon encountering others who are doing bad deeds we should respond with disregard.
This purifies the mind for yoga.
maitrí-karunā-muditopekshānām sukha-duhkha-punyāpunya-vishayānām bhāvanātaś citta-prasādanam

34. Or we can avoid the obstacles and purify the mind
by a controlled exhalation
followed by a retention of the breath.
pracchardana-vidhāranābhyām vā prānasya

35. Or, another way to steady the mind
(and avoid being swept under by the obstacles)
is to keep it fixed on a single object or idea.
vishayavatí vā pravrttir utpannā manasah shiti-nibandhaní

36. Or the mind can be steadied and obstacles overcome by concentrating on a pure joyous inner luminosity.
viśokā vā jyotishmatí

37. Or the mind can be steadied
by focusing on someone who is already free from all desires.
vítarāgavishayam vā cittam

38. Or the mind can be steadied
by focusing on knowledge or experience
gained while sleeping.
svapna-nidrā-jñānālambanam vā

39. Or the mind can be steadied
by focusing on any object or principle that is appealing.
yathābhimata-dhyānād vā

40. With a concentrated, undistracted mind
comes mastery over everything from the smallest particle
to the universe as a whole.
paramānu-parama-mahattvānto ‘sya vaśíkārah

41. As it becomes still, the mind becomes
like a faceted clear crystal
in which the experiencer, the object of experience
and the process of experiencing itself
is seen together seamlessly.
With focus and stability, a saturated true cognitive blending
is reached (“samāpatti”).
kshína-vrtter abhijātasyeva maner grahítr-grahana-grāhyeshu tat-stha-añjanatā samāpattih

42. With “samāpatti” initially,
the object’s name, the meaning behind the name
and all other information connected to that object
are blended with the sensorial experience of that object.
tatra śabdārtha-jñāna-vikalpaih sankírnā savitarkā samāpatti

43. When memory is purified
and there is a realization of emptiness
then meaning alone stands forth without sense impressions.
This is called “nirvitarkā samāpatti.”
smrti-pariśuddhau svarūpa-śūnyevārtha-mātra-nirbhāsā nirvitarkā

44 & 45. This same process of meditative cognitive blending relating to objects also happens relating to thought itself. Ultimately then the yogi sees the purpose and meaning
behind even the most subtle of thoughts
and their corresponding objects.
etayaiva savicārā nirvicārā ca sūkshma-vishayā vyākhyātāsūkshma-vishayatvam cālinga-paryavasānam

46. These states of “samapātti” can be called
“sabíjah samādhi,” or “samādhi” with seed.
tā eva sabíjah samādhih

47. Through “nirvicārā samāpatti,” purity is achieved
and the primordial self becomes illuminated
and clearly seen.
nirvicārā-vaiśaradye ‘dhyātma-prasādah

48. Within “nirvicārā samāpatti”
wisdom of the most profound nature dawns.
rtanbharā tatra prajñā

49. This wisdom differs from that deriving
from conventional learning or one’s own insight
because it is focused on the special purpose
underlying all objects.
śrutānumāna-prajñābhyām anyavishayā viśesharthatvāt

50. The “sanskāra” created by this new wisdom
stops the creation of any other type of “sanskāra.”
taj-jah sanskāro ‘nya-sanskāra-pratibandhī

51. When that wisdom born of “samādhi” is relinquished
then everything ends
and the yogi enters the “nirbíjah samādhi”
or “samādhi” without seed.
tasyāpi nirodhe sarva-nirodhān nirbíjah samāshih

BOOK TWO

1. Physical austerity, the repetition or recitation
of devotional “mantra/japa”
and surrender/dedication to “Īśvara”
comprise “kriya yoga.”
tapah-svādhyāyeśvara-pranidhānāni kriyā-yogah

2. The practice of “kriya yoga”
weakens afflicting factors in the mind
and leads to absorption in “samādhi.”
samādhi-bhāvanārthah kleśa-tanū-karanārthaś ca

3. The “kleśa-s,” or obstructions, are
ignorance, ego, selfish desire, hatred
and the drive to survive.
avidyāsmitā-rāga-dveshābhiniveśeh kleśah

4. Ignorance is the base
upon which the other obstructions rest and grow.
They can be either dormant, feeble, intermittent or intense.
avidyā kshetram uttareshām prasupta-tanu-vicchinnodārānām

5. Seeing what is
impermanent, impure, painful and not me or mine
as something that is
eternal, pure, joyful and me or mine
is ignorance (“avidyā”).
anityāśuci-duhkhānātmasu nitya-śuci-sukhātma-khyātir avidyā

6. Ego is created by the apparent connection
between the power to see and the experience of seeing.
drk-darśana-śaktyor ekātmatevāsmitā

7. The passion that arises from a desire for pleasure
is the obstacle to yoga called “rāga.”
sukhānuśayí rāgah

8. Aversion, “dvesha” (the 4th obstacle),
occurs in connection with experiencing suffering.
duhkānuśayí dveshah

9. The drive to survive, “abhiniveśa,”
is a self-driven force hidden within even the wise.
sva-rasa-vāhí vidusho ‘pi tathārūdho ‘bhiniveśah

10. To be free of the obstacles
we simply stop feeding them.
te pratiprasava-heyāh sūkshmāh

11. These obstacles are disturbances of the mind
that can be eliminated through meditation.
dhyāna-heyās tad-vrttayah

12. These obstacles to yoga come from our karmic past actions which, whether we remember them or not,
produce results through successive lifetimes.
kleśa-mūlah karmāśayo drshtādrshta-janma-vedaníyah

13. Karma ripens, dependent on the “kleśa-s,”
to determine the social conditions of our birth,
our length of life and what wealth comes our way.
sati mule tad-vipāko jātyāyur-bhogāh

14. Pleasant conditions
related to birth, longevity and wealth
come from virtuous past actions
and unpleasant conditions in these three
come from past vices.
te hlāda-paritāpa-phalāh punyāpunya-hetutvāt

15. The wise person views life as suffering
because of (1) its tendency to fluctuate in a painful way,
(2) our deep seated unhealthy habits,
and (3) the resistance within Nature itself (the “guna-s”)
to our freedom.
parināma-tāpa-sanskāra-duhkhair guna-vrtti-virodhāc ca duhkham eva sarvam vivekinah

16. We can be free of suffering
through yoga.
heyam duhkam anāgtam

17. Future suffering ends
without the correlation between the seer and the seen.
drashtr-drśyayoh samyogo heya-hetuh

18. The seen is made up of the 3 guna-s
(luminosity, activity and groundedness),
which characterize both the elements
and the senses that perceive them,
delivering a purpose of experience or liberation.
prakāśa-kriyā-sthiti-śílam bhūtendriyātmakam bhogāpavargārtham drśyam

19. Differences and similarities,
characteristics and their absence,
are a result of shifting dominance in the “guna-s.”
viśeshāviśesha-lingamātrālingāni guna-parvāni

20. The Seer seeing is the only pure thing,
simply witnessing even thoughts themselves.
drashtā drśi-mātrah śuddho ‘pi pratyayānupaśyah

21. The sole purpose of the Seer
is to see through the seeable to its essence (“ātmā”).
tad-artha eva drśyasyātmā

22. Upon attaining the purpose there is cessation,
while for others the world continues as usual.
krtārtham prati nashtam apyanashtam tad anya-sādhāranatvāt

23. Perceiving oneself to be involved
in the interaction between the two powers
(to be and to experience)
is the cause of suffering and is called “sanyoga.”
sva-svāmi-śaktyoh svarūpopalbdhi-hetuh sanyogah

24. The cause of making this correlation
is ignorance.
tasya hetur avidyā

25. When ignorance is vanquished
the correlation falls apart
and the power of seeing remains alone.
tad-abhāvāt sanyogābhāvo hānam tad-drśeh kaivalyam

26. The most skillful means of ending this correlation
is continual applied awareness of the distinction.
viveka-khyātir aviplavā hānopāyah

27. The supreme and final insight
develops in 7 stages
when this discernment is vigorously held to.
tasya saptadhā prānta-bhūmih prajñā

28. Practicing the limbs of yoga will destroy impurities,
allowing inner clarity to arise
and lead the aspirant to the final and supreme insight.
yogāngānusthānād aśuddhi-ksaye jñāna-díptir āviveka-khyāteh

29. The eight limbs are yama, niyamā, āsana, prānāyāma, pratyāhāra, dhāranā, dhyāna and samādhi.
yama-niyamāsana-prānāyāma-pratyāhāra-dhāranā-dhyāna-samādhayo ‘stāv angāni

30. The “yama-s” are
“ahimsā,” “satya,” “asteya,” “brahmacarya” and “aparigrahā.”
ahimsā-satyāsteya-brahmacaryāparigrahā yamah

31. The “yama-s” make up a great vow
that everyone can make
regardless of social status, age, place of residence
or other circumstance.
ete jāti-deśa-kāla-samayānavacchinnāh sārva-bhaumā mahāvratam

32 . “Niyamā” includes
purity, happiness, physical austerity,
the repetition or recitation of devotional “Īśvara” “mantra/japa” and surrender/devotion to the Divine.
śauca-santosha-tapah-svādhyāyeśvara-pranidhānāni niyamāh

33. The right qualities can be realized
by blocking any feeling, belief or habit
that is opposite to them.
vitarka-bādhane pratipaksha-bhāvanam

34. Thoughts and inclinations that oppose the “yama-s,”
beginning with harmfulness,
whether acted on by oneself, instigated in others
or approved of in others,
are all the result of greed, anger and delusion.
They get expressed either violently, moderately or mildly
and always perpetuate ignorance and suffering.
Therefore the antidotes should be applied.
vitarkā hinsādayah krta-kāritānumoditā lobha-krodha-moha-pūrvakā mrdu-madhyādhimātrā duhkhājñānānanta-phalā iti pratipaksha-bhāvanam

35. When the “yama” of harmlessness (“ahimsā”) is established
the quality of hostility
ceases to arise in the yogi’s presence.
ahimsā-pratishthāyām tat-sannidhau vaira-tyāgah

36. When truthfulness (“satya”) has been established,
the fruits of actions become dependent on the yogi.
satya-pratishthāyām kriyā-phalāśrayatvam

37. All forms of wealth come to the yogi
who is established in non-stealing (“asteya”).
asteya-pratishthāyām sarva-ratnopasthānam

38. The yogi established in “brahmacarya”
gains unceasing vigor.
brahmacarya-pratishthāyām vírya-lābhah

39. A yogi established in non-possessiveness (“aparigrahā”)understands and sees the truth of rebirth.
aparigraha-sthairye janma-kathantā-sambodhah

40. Through the establishment of purity (“śauca”)
the yogi feels an aversion to the body
and its experience of contact with others.
śaucāt svānga-jugupsā parair sansargah

41. Purity also instills a “sattvic” cheerful nature towards others, one-pointedness of mind and a mastery over the senses.
Through purity the yogi becomes ready to perceive the “atman.”
sattva-śuddhi-saumanasyaikāgryendriya-jayātma-darśana-yogyatvāni ca

42. Perfecting the “niyamā” of happiness (“santosha”)
creates a supreme sublime bliss in the yogi.
santoshād anuttamah sukha-lābhah

43. Austerity (“tapas”) eliminates impurities
and leads to the superhuman development of the senses(“siddhi-s”).
kāyendriya-siddhir aśuddhi-kshayāt tapasah

44. “Svādhyāya” leads to feeling a connection to a Beloved form of the Divine.
svādhyāyād ishta-devatā-samprayogah

45. Devotion to the Divine (“Īśvara pranidhānā”) leads to mastery of “samādhi.”
samādhi-siddhir íśvara-pranidhānāt

46. “Āsana” is a physical posture
that is comfortable.
sthira-sukham āsanam

47. “Āsana” is perfected
when there is no more effort
and the mind is absorbed into the Infinite.
prayatna-śaithilyānanta-samāpattibhyām

48. Perfection in “āsana”
leads to forbearance with all dualities.
tato dvandvānabhihātah

49. When “āsana” is perfected,
the yogi controls the in- and the out-breath (“prānāyāma).
tasmin sati śvāsa-praśvāsayor gati-vicchedah prānāyāmah

50. In observing the breath as it cycles
externally, internally and stopped,
based on location, time and count,
it becomes drawn out and subtle.
bāhyābhyantara-stambha-vrttir deśa-kāla-sankhyābhih-paridrshto dírgha-sūkshmah

51. The fourth stage (“prānāyāma”) occurs
when all internal and external reference has ended.
bāhyābhyantara-vishayākshepí caturthah

52. Then the veil that covers the inner light
falls away.
tatah kshíyate prakāśāvaranam

53. As a result the mind becomes
concentrated and fit.
dhāranāsu ca yogyatā manasah

54. The senses then disconnect from their objects
(in “pratyāhāra”)
as the mind starts to resemble its own essential nature.
sva-vishayāsamprayoge cittasya svarūpānukāra ivendriyānām pratyāhārah

55. “Pratyāhāra” thus produces
the supreme mastery of the senses.
tatah paramā vaśyatendriyānām

BOOK THREE

1.”Dhāranā” is the fixation
of the mind on a place.
deśa-bandhaś cittasya dhāranā

2. Meditation (“dhyāna”) occurs
when perception becomes one-pointed.
Tatra pratyayaika-tānatā dhyāna

3. “Samādhi” occurs
when meaning alone is perceived everywhere
and the individuality of objects is seen as false.
tad evārtha-mātra-nirbhāsam svarūpa-shūnyam iva samādhih

4. The practice of these three, together,
is called “sanyama.”
trayam ekatra sanyamah

5. Through the mastery of “sanyama”
comes supreme knowledge and brilliance.
taj-jayāt prajñālokah

6. “Sanyama” is applied in stages.
tasya bhūmishu viniyogah

7. “Sanyama” is the inner limb
relative to the previous 5 limbs of yoga.
trayam antar-angam pūrvebhyah

8. Seedless [“samādhi”] is the inner limb relative to “sanyama.”
tad api bahir-angam nirbījasya

9. Within “sanyama” a transformation (“parināma”) occurs
through 3 stages of cessation (“nirodha”):
cessation of the external,
cessation of the desires to become and to disappear,
and the cessation of the yogi’s connection to time.
vyutthāna-nirodha-sanskārayor abhibhava-prādur-bhāvau nirodha-kshana-cittanvayo nirodha-parināmah

10. Transformations are powered and directed
by our own inherent drive for peace.
tasya praśānta-vāhitā sanskārāt

11. The first transformation happens in “samādhi”
and involves the falling away of the external.
sarvārthataikāgratayoh ksayodayay cittasya samādhi-parināmah

12. The second transformation, into one-pointedness,
involves the recognition that the two desires (“sanskāra-s”)
for peace and development
are equally both just thoughts within the mind.
tatah punah śāntoditau tulya-pratyayau cittasyaikāgratā-parināmah

13. Transformations involving the elements,
the senses and their external objects;
related to function, age and overall condition;
follow upon these transformations in the mind of the yogi.
etena bhūtendriyeshu dharma-lakshanāvasthā-parināmā vyākhyātāh

14. The characteristics of something
in its past, present and unknown future form
always conform to the underlying “dharma.”
śāntoditāvyapadeśya-dharmānupātī dharmī

15. The conformity of objects to the underlying “dharma”
is due to the separateness of the developmental mode
from the cessation mode.
kramānyatvam parināmānyatve hetuh

16. Freed from the law of time
the yogi gains accurate knowledge of the past and the future
simply through the power of “sanyama”
and the three transformations within it.
parināma-traya-sanyamād atītānāgata-jñānam

17. Knowledge of all languages arises in the yogi
due to the clarity of “sanyama.”
śabdārtha-pratyayānām itaretarādhyāsāt sankaras tat-pravibhāga-sanyamāt sarva-bhūta-ruta-jñānam

18. Witnessing the functioning of the law of karma,
the yogi perceives the history of past lives.
sanskāra-sāksāt-karanāt pūrva-jāti-jñānam

19. The yogi (in “sanyama”)
perceives others’ thoughts.
pratyayasya para-citta-jñānam

20. The yogi knows others’ thoughts only
and not the underlying real-life situations
that caused them.
na ca tat sālambanam tasyāvishayī-bhūtatvāt

21. Focusing on the body itself in “sanyama,”
the yogi ceases to be an object for experiencing:
the eye and light are disconnected
and the yogi becomes invisible.
kaya-rūpa-sanyamāt tad-grāhya-śakti-stambhe caksuh-prakāśāsamprayoge ‘ntardhānam

22a. In the same way [that the yogi can become invisible]
sounds also disappear.
etena śabdādy-antardhānam uktam

22b. By focusing in “sanyama”
on either of the two ways in which “karma” plays out
(immediate or delayed)
or by following omens
the yogi can predict endings.
sopakramam nirupakramam ca karma tat-sanyamād aparānta-jñānam aristebhyo vā

23. By focusing in “sanyama”
on the qualities beginning with friendship
their strengths develop.
maitryādisu balāni

24. By “sanyama” on strengths,
they are all acquired,
beginning with the physical strength of an elephant.
baleshu hasti-balādīni

25. By mentally projecting bright light everywhere
the yogi comes to know
what is subtle, hidden and distant.
pravrttyāloka-nyāsāt sūkshma-vyahita-viprokrsta-jñānam

26. Knowledge of the world
comes to the yogi through “sanyama” on the Sun.
bhuvana-jñānam sūrye sanyamāt

27. “Sanyama” meditation on the Moon
produces knowledge of the stars.
candre tārā-vyūha-jñānam

28. By focusing on the pole star
in “sanyama” meditation
the yogi knows the movement of the stars.
dhruve tad-gati-jñānam

29. Through “sanyama” meditation
on the navel chakra
the yogi gains knowledge
of the physical organization of the body.
nābhi-cakre kaya-vyūha-jñānam

30. “Sanyama” meditation
focused on the pit of the throat
stills hunger and thirst in the yogi.
katha-kūpe kshut-pipāsā-nivrttih

31. Meditative focus on the tortoise “nadi”
establishes the yogi in immobility.
kūrma-nādyām sthairyam

32. By focusing in “sanyama” meditation
on the light at the top of the head,
great saints appear.
mūrdha-jyotisi siddha-darśanam

33. All is revealed to the yogi
in a flash of spiritual perception.
prātibhād vā sarvam

34. This knowledge comes
through connecting the heart and mind.
hrdaye citta-samvit

35. Through “sanyama” meditation
on the distinction between the sattvic and the self,
the way that thought doesn’t recognize that distinction
and the inherent self-interest of ordinary life
(ignoring the true purpose of life)
the yogi gains direct knowledge of the self.
sattva-purusayor atyantāsankīrnayoh pratyayāviśeso bhogah parārthāt svārtha-sanyamāt purusa-jñānam

36. From that realization
supra-sensory abilities are born
(hearing, touch, sight, taste, smell and intelligence).
tatah prātibha-śrāvana-vedanādarśāsvāda-vārttā jāyante

37. When these superpowers
are simply external powers
they are obstacles to achieving “samādhi.”
te samādhāv upasargā vyutthāne siddhayah

38. Upon being released
from karmic cause and effect
the yogi experiences going forth
out of the physical body into a mind-made one.
bandha-kārana-śaithilyāt pracāra-samvedanāc ca cittasya para-śarīrāveśah

39. Through mastery of the “udāna” energy
the yogi rises above water, mud, thorns, etc.
udāna-jayāj jala-panka-kantakādisvasanga utkrāntiś ca

40. With the mastery of the “samāna” energy
the yogi becomes radiant.
samāna-jayāj jvalanam

41. Through “sanyama” meditation
on the relationship between “akāsha” (space)
and the act of hearing
the yogi gains divine hearing.
śrotrakāśayoh sambandha-sanyamād divyam śrotram

42. Through “sanyama” meditation
on the relationship between “akasha” and the body,
combined with “samāpatti” meditation on the lightness of cotton the yogi acquires the ability
to travel through space in any direction.
kāyākāśayoh sambandha-sanyamāl laghu-tūla-samāpatteś cākāsa-gamanam

43. Through that out of body experience
the coverings of light lift away.
bahir akalpitā vrttir mahā-videhā tatah prakāśāvarana-ksayah

44. The yogi becomes a master of the elements
after focusing in “sanyama” meditation
on the reason why the self seems to be involved
with both subtle and gross objects.
sthūla-svarūpa-sūkshmānvayārthavattva-sanyamād bhūta-jayah

45. Through the mastery of the elements
the yogi gains the complete range of powers
starting with the power to become minute,
in addition to the perfection of the physical body
and the freedom from affliction within all situations.
tato ‘nimādi-prādur-bhāvah kaya-sampat tad-dharmānabhighātaś ca

46. Beauty, grace, strength and adamantine hardness characterize the perfection of the body.
rūpa-lāvanya-bala-vajra-samhananatvāni kaya-sampat

47. When the yogi focuses in “sanyama” meditation
on the way in which grasping at the true self
produces the sense of “I AM”
and how a sense of purposefulness
connects all of life together
then all the sense organs come under full control.
grahana-svarūpa-asmitā-anvaya-arthavattva-sanyamāt indriya-jayah

48. Also from that meditation (of the previous sutra)
the yogi gains the ability to travel as fast as thought,
unlimited by the body,
completely mastering the forces of nature.
tato mano-javitvam vikarana-bhāvah pradhāna-jayaś ca

49. The yogi becomes omnipotent and omniscient
when the knowledge of the true self
as distinct from the “sattvic”
becomes his or her only perception.
sattva-purushānyatā-khyāti-mātrasya sarva-bhāvādishtātrtvam sarva-jñātrtvam ca

50. Through detachment
to his or her own supernatural power
the yogi’s deepest impurities are purged
and kaivalya is reached.
tad-vairāgyāt api dosha-bīja-kshaye kaivalyam

51. The accomplished yogi rejects
the invitation of celestial beings
to enjoy their heavenly realms,
remaining unmoved
due to the dangers therein
of falling back into undesirable states.
sthānyupanimantrane sanga-smayā-karanam punar-anishta-prasangāt

52. True discernment-born awareness, “viveka,”
dawns through focusing in “sanyama” meditation
on time and its cohesiveness.
kshana-tat-kramayoh sanyamād viveka-jam jñānam

53. This discernment-born awareness
gives the ability to see differences
even in objects that are identical
in type, characteristics and place.
jāti lakshana deshair anyatānavaccchedāt tulyayos tatah pratipattih

54. This discernment-born wisdom, “viveka,”
leads the yogi to a state
beyond all space and time.
tārakam sarva-vishayam sarvathā-vishayam akramam ceti vivekajam jñānam

55. The final state of “kaivalya”
is reached upon seeing the equality
between the pure Spirit (“purusha”)
and the purified mind of the yogi.
sattva-purushayoh shuddhi-samye kaivalyam

BOOK FOUR

1. Superpowers can result from
the use of certain herbs,
“mantra-s,” austerities, “samādhi”
or can be present at birth.
janmaushadhi-mantra-tapah-samādhijāh siddhayah

2. Rebirth involves a transformation,
“parināma,”
that happens when nature or “prakriti” overflows.
jātyantara-parināmah prakrtyāpūrāt

3. Like a farmer removing obstacles,
nature progresses,
and not just by simple cause and effect.
nimittam aprayojakam prakrtínām varana-bhedas tu tatah kshetrikavat

4. The ego mind,
defining us individually as different,
is created entirely by “asmitā,”
the sense that “I AM” here/now.
nirmāna-cittānyasmitā-mātrāt

5. In the general diversity of possible activities
there is only one mind behind them all.
pravrtti-bhede prayojakam cittam ekam anekeshām

6. Of all possible undertakings,
only those pursued in a meditative state
do not accumulate [“karma”].
tatra dhyāna-jam anāśayam

7. A yogi’s karma
is neither white nor black
while others incur one of three types.
karmāśuklākrsnam yoginas trividham itareshām

8. The fruition of karma
follows the “guna-s”
and leads us into addictive habit patterns.
tatas tad-vidākānugunānām evābhivyaktir vāsanām

9. Across different births, times and lands,
we experience a uniformity to our lives
due to uninterrupted carryover
of memories and habitual tendencies.
jāti deśa kāla vyavahitānām apyānantaryam smrti sankārayor eka rūpatvāt

10. No beginning can be found
to memories, habits and desires
due to eternality.
tāsām anāditvam cāśiso nityatvāt

11. These things come to an end however
when their cause, effects, underlying support
and objects of focus come to an end.
hetu-phala āśrayālambanaih sangrhítatvād eshām abhāve tad-abhāvah

12. Time is a path between the past and the future
that is essentially just the tracking of changes
in the properties of objects.
atítānāgatam svarūpato’styadhva-bhedād dharmānām

13. These objects, whether manifest or subtle,
are composed of the “guna-s.”
te vyaktasūksmā gunātmānah

14. The dependability and homogeneity
of how objects change
give them their sense of reality.
parināmaikatvāt vastu-tattvam

15. Proposing that reality is due
to a homogeneity in objects
versus due to a diversity in perception
are two opposite doctrines.
vastu-sāmye citta-bhedāt tayor vibhaktah panthāh

16. Objects don’t depend on a single mind
in order to exist
for what would happen to them then
when they aren’t thus seen?
na caika-citta-tantram vastu tad apramānakam tadā kim syāt

17. Due to their interdependence,
a mind gets colored
by the knowledge of an object.
tad-uparāgāpeksitvāc cittasya vastu jñātājñātam

18. The changing mental states and activities
are always known to one
who has mastered them through the knowledge
of the unchanging nature of the “purusha.”
sadā jñātāś citta-vrttayas tat-prabhoh puruśasyāparināmitvāt

19. The changing mind is not self-illuminating
because it is part of the seeable.
na tat svābhāsam drśyatvāt

20. It is impossible to be aware
of both at the same time.
eka-samaye cobhayānavadhāranam

21. If there were two minds, seeing each other,
there would be an infinite regression of perception
and a confusion of memory.
cittāntara-drśye buddhi-buddher atiprasangah smrti-sankaraś ca

22. When one’s mind assumes the form
of the unchanging principle that is beyond time
then it truly knows itself.
citer apratisankramāyās tad-ākārā pattau svabuddhi-samvedanam

23. A mind that is colored by both the seer and the seeable
allows one to pursue
any possible purpose in life.
drastr-drśyoparaktam cittam sarvārtham

24. Such a mind has a countless variety
of habitual “vāsanā-s”
although the other purpose will have an influence
once activated.
tad asankhyeya-vāsanābhish citram api parārtham sanhatya-kāritvāt

25. The transcendent power of distinguishing the seer
from the seeable
cuts off the mental inquires
around self, being and experiencing.
viśesha-darśina ātma-bhāva-bhāvanā-vinivrttih

26. The transcendent power of discrimination
bears the mind onward to liberation
like a river flows to the sea.
tadā viveka-nimnam kaivalya-prāg-bhāram cittam

27. There are, however, lapses in progress
in which thoughts about objects arise
due to deep-seated habitual tendencies (“sanskāra-s”).
tac-chidreshu pratyayāntarāni sanskārebhyah

28. Overcoming these habitual tendencies (“sanskāra-s”)
and the root afflictions (“kleśa-s”)
has already been explained.
hānam eshām kleśavad uktam

29. Complete absorption into truth
(“dharma-megha samādhi”)
occurs to the yogi who constantly maintains
the transcendent discrimination (“viveka-khyati”)
and rejects all possible fruits.
prasankhyāne ‘pyakusídasya sarvathā viveka-khyater dharma-meghah samādhih

30. From that (“dharma megha samādhi”)
the “kleśa-s” and “karma” cease entirely.
tatah kleśa-karma nivrttih

31. When the taints that obscure knowledge are removed,
wisdom is grounded in the infinite
and the knowable is seen as trivial.
tadā sarvāvarana-malāpetasya jñānasyānantyāj jñeyam alpam

32. Due to that, the “guna-s” have fulfilled the purpose
of their sequential changes
which now come to an end.
tatah krtārthānām parināma-krama-samāptir gunānām

33. The sequence of Time is then seen
as simply the successive assemblage
of the end results of many small moments of change.
ksana-pratiyogí parināmāparānta-nirgrāhyah kramah

34. The “guna-s” dissolve,
holding no value for the purusha,
leaving the yogi in a state of kaivalyam,
abiding simply in one’s own form
as the power of pure awareness.
purushārtha-śūnyānām gunānām pratiprasavah kāivalyam svarūpa-pratisthā vā citi-śakter iti

LINKS TO COMMENTARIES

INTRODUCTION

BOOK 1

SUTRA 1   Now, the teaching of Yoga!
SUTRA 2  Yoga is a process that stills the mind.
SUTRA 3  In Yoga,the seer becomes established in his or her own essential nature.
SUTRA 4  Outside of Yoga,the seer is caught up and identified with fluctuating thoughts and perceptions.
SUTRA 5 There are five basic types of fluctuating thought, any of which are capable of causing either joy or pain.
SUTRA 6  The five types of fluctuating thoughts are “pramāna,” “viparyaya,” “vikalpa,” “nidrā,” and “smrti.”
SUTRA 7 Correct thoughts, “pramāna,” come from either your own direct and accurate perception,
accurate logical inference (reasoning) or the testimony of a trustworthy source.
SUTRA 8  Wrong thoughts (“viparyaya”) occur when an idea about something doesn’t match what the object actually is.
SUTRA 9  Imagination (“vikalpa”) is a thought that is based on a mental image describable by words but not based on an object directly observable.
SUTRA 10  Deep sleep (“nidrā”) is a mental fluctuation that is characterized by the absence of superficial thoughts.
SUTRA 11 When thoughts created through an experience return to mind after the experience has ended that is memory (“smrti”).
SUTRA 12  In order for mental fluctuations to disappear, a diligent persistent practice (“abhyāsa”)
combined with a detached attitude (“vairāgya”) must be developed and sustained.
SUTRA 13 “Abhyāsa” is an unrelenting determination expressed in maximum effort in order to reach the stability of a state free of mental fluctuations.
SUTRA 14 This practice (“abhyāsa”) must be maintained with vigor and sincerity
over a prolonged period of time without interruption so that it becomes solid and established.
SUTRA 15   “Vairāgya” is a state of mastery over all desires for things seen or heard about.
SUTRA 16  “Vairāgya” is perfected when one realizes one’s identity with the inner witness (“purusha-khyāti”) and a freedom from attachment to all of Nature (the “gunas”) results.
SUTRA 17  The initial stages of the process of stilling the mind are called “with knowledge” (“samprajñā”) because an awareness of the gross and subtle aspects of objects is retained. This is accompanied with feelings of joy and is grounded in the idea of existing.
SUTRA 18  As stillness of the mind deepens with continued practice, knowledge of the gross and subtle aspects of reality fall away, leaving only the residue (“sanskāra”) of knowing, itself.
SUTRA 19  This state of stillness is the same as experienced by both disembodied souls and souls who are emerging from the unmanifest, waiting for bodies.
SUTRA 20  For the embodied yogi, however, this state of stillness is the direct result of progressively attaining faith, vigor, a concentrated mind, “samādhi” and finally, ultimate wisdom.
SUTRA 21  The goal of yoga is not far for those who practice with piercing intensity.
SUTRA 22  Practice in yoga bears fruit respective of its intensity: mild, moderate or intense.
SUTRA 23  Devotion to the Divine (“Īśvara”) is also effective in stilling the mind, taking into account the degree of intensity with which it is pursued.
SUTRA 24  “Íśvara” is a direct manifestation of the “purusha,” is not bound by “karma” and is not affected by the “kleśa-s.”
SUTRA 25  In “Īśvara” lies the unsurpassable seed of all knowledge.
SUTRA 26  “Īśvara” was the guru of the first gurus, being beyond the limits of time.
SUTRA 27  “Īśvara-s” name is the exultation of His/Her greatness (the “pranava” mantra).
SUTRA 28  Repeating the “pranava” leads to absorption into its meaning.
SUTRA 29  Repetition of the “pranava” mantra destroys all obstacles and turns consciousness inward.
SUTRA 30  Sickness, apathy, indecision, heedlessness (lack of mental focus to do the work), laziness, lust, wrong ideas, fall from a desired state and the inability to maintain a desired state can all agitate or distract the mind and so, can impede progress with yoga.
SUTRA 31  Pain, dejection, physical trembling, unconscious breathing and excited breathing are the effects of these disruptions.
SUTRA 32  The yogi can avoid or quell these problematic states by steadily applying one antidote when the obstacle arises.
SUTRA 33  Upon encountering others who are experiencing happiness we should respond with friendliness.
Upon encountering others who are experiencing sorrow we should respond with compassion.
Upon encountering others who are doing good deeds we should respond with celebration.
Upon encountering others who are doing bad deeds we should respond with disregard.
This purifies the mind for yoga.
SUTRA 34  Or we can avoid the obstacles and purify the mind by a controlled exhalation followed by a retention of the breath.
SUTRA 35  Or, another way to steady the mind (and avoid being swept under by the obstacles) is to keep it fixed on a single object or idea.
SUTRA 36  Or the mind can be steadied and obstacles overcome by concentrating on a pure joyous inner luminosity.
SUTRA 37  Or the mind can be steadied by focusing on someone who is already free from all desires.
SUTRA 38  Or the mind can be steadied by focusing on knowledge or experience gained while sleeping.
SUTRA 39  Or the mind can be steadied by focusing on any object or principle that is appealing.
SUTRA 40  With a concentrated, undistracted mind comes mastery over everything from the smallest particle to the universe as a whole.
SUTRA 41  As it becomes still, the mind becomes like a faceted clear crystal in which the experiencer, the object of experience and the process of experiencing itself is seen together seamlessly.
With focus and stability, a saturated true cognitive blending is reached (“samāpatti”).
SUTRA 42  With “samāpatti” initially, the object’s name, the meaning behind the name and all other information connected to that object are blended with the sensorial experience of that object.
SUTRA 43  When memory is purified and there is a realization of emptiness then meaning alone stands forth without sense impressions. This is called “nirvitarkā samāpatti.”
SUTRA 44 & 45  This same process of meditative cognitive blending relating to objects also happens relating to thought itself. Ultimately then the yogi sees the purpose and meaning behind even the most subtle of thoughts and their corresponding objects.
SUTRA 46  These states of “samapātti” can be called “sabíjah samādhi,” or “samādhi” with seed.
SUTRA 47  Through “nirvicārā samāpatti,” purity is achieved and the primordial self becomes illuminated and clearly seen.
SUTRA 48  Within “nirvicārā samāpatti” wisdom of the most profound nature dawns.
SUTRA 49  This wisdom differs from that deriving from conventional learning or one’s own insight
because it is focused on the special purpose underlying all objects.
SUTRA 50  The “sanskāra” created by this new wisdom stops the creation of any other type of “sanskāra.”
SUTRA 51  When that wisdom born of “samādhi” is relinquished then everything ends and the yogi enters the “nirbíjah samādhi” or “samādhi” without seed.

BOOK 2

SUTRA 1  Physical austerity, the repetition or recitation of devotional “mantra/japa” and surrender/dedication to “Īśvara” comprise “kriya yoga.”
SUTRA 2 The practice of “kriya yoga” weakens afflicting factors in the mind and leads to absorption in “samādhi.”
SUTRA 3 The “kleśa-s,” or obstructions, are ignorance, ego, selfish desire, hatred and the drive to survive.
SUTRA 4  Ignorance is the base upon which the other obstructions rest and grow. They can be either dormant, feeble, intermittent or intense.
SUTRA 5  Seeing what is impermanent, impure, painful and not me or mine as something that is eternal, pure, joyful and me or mine is ignorance (“avidyā”).
SUTRA 6  Ego is created by the apparent connection between the power to see and the experience of seeing.
SUTRA 7 The passion that arises from a desire for pleasure is the obstacle to yoga called “rāga.”
SUTRA 8 Aversion, “dvesha” (the 4th obstacle), occurs in connection with experiencing suffering.
SUTRA 9 The drive to survive, “abhiniveśa,” is a self-driven force hidden within even the wise.
SUTRA 10 To be free of the obstacles we simply stop feeding them.
SUTRA 11 These obstacles are disturbances of the mind that can be eliminated through meditation.
SUTRA 12 These obstacles to yoga come from our karmic past actions which, whether we remember them or not, produce results through successive lifetimes.
SUTRA 13   Karma ripens, dependent on the “kleśa-s,” to determine the social conditions of our birth,
our length of life and what wealth comes our way.
SUTRA 14   Pleasant conditions related to birth, longevity and wealth come from virtuous past actions and unpleasant conditions in these three come from past vices.
SUTRA 15   The wise person views life as suffering because of (1) its tendency to fluctuate in a painful way, (2) our deep seated unhealthy habits, and (3) the resistance within Nature itself (the “guna-s”)
to our freedom.
SUTRA 16 We can be free of suffering through yoga.
SUTRA 17   Future suffering ends without the correlation between the seer and the seen.
SUTRA 18 The seen is made up of the 3 guna-s (luminosity, activity and groundedness), which characterize both the elements and the senses that perceive them, delivering a purpose of experience or liberation.
SUTRA 19   Differences and similarities, characteristics and their absence, are a result of shifting dominance in the “guna-s.”
SUTRA 20   The Seer seeing is the only pure thing, simply witnessing even thoughts themselves.
SUTRA 21  The sole purpose of the Seer is to see through the seeable to its essence (“ātmā”).
SUTRA 22 Upon attaining the purpose there is cessation, while for others the world continues as usual.
SUTRA 23 Perceiving oneself to be involved in the interaction between the two powers
(to possess and to be possessable) is the cause of suffering and is called “sanyoga.”
SUTRA 24 The cause of making this correlation is ignorance.
SUTRA 25 When ignorance is vanquished the correlation falls apart and the power of seeing remains alone.
SUTRA 26 The most skillful means of ending this correlation is continual applied awareness of the distinction.
SUTRA 27  The supreme and final insight develops in 7 stages when this discernment is vigorously held to.
SUTRA 28 Practicing the limbs of yoga will destroy impurities, allowing inner clarity to arise and lead the aspirant to the final and supreme insight.
SUTRA 29  The eight limbs are yama, niyamā, āsana, prānāyāma, pratyāhāra, dhāranā, dhyāna and samādhi.
SUTRA 30  The “yama-s” are “ahimsā,” “satya,” “asteya,” “brahmacarya” and “aparigrahā.”
SUTRA 31 The “yama-s” make up a great vow that everyone can make regardless of social status, age, place of residence or other circumstance.
SUTRA 32  “Niyamā” includes purity, happiness, physical austerity, the repetition or recitation of devotional “Īśvara” “mantra/japa” and surrender/devotion to the Divine.
SUTRA 33   The right qualities can be realized by blocking any feeling, belief or habit that is opposite to them.
SUTRA 34   Thoughts and inclinations that oppose the “yama-s,” beginning with harmfulness,
whether acted on by oneself, instigated in others or approved of in others, are all the result of greed, anger and delusion. They get expressed either violently, moderately or mildly and always perpetuate ignorance and suffering. Therefore the antidotes should be applied.
SUTRA 35  When the “yama” of harmlessness (“ahimsā”) is established the quality of hostility
ceases to arise in the yogi’s presence.
SUTRA 36  When truthfulness (“satya”) has been established, the fruits of actions become dependent on the yogi.
SUTRA 37 All forms of wealth come to the yogi who is established in non-stealing (“asteya”).
SUTRA 38   The yogi established in “brahmacarya” gains unceasing vigor.
SUTRA 39   A yogi established in non-possessiveness (“aparigrahā”) understands and sees the truth of rebirth.
SUTRA 40   Through the establishment of purity (“śauca”) the yogi feels an aversion to the body
and its experience of contact with others.
SUTRA 41   Purity also instills a “sattvic” cheerful nature towards others, one-pointedness of mind and a mastery over the senses. Through purity the yogi becomes ready to perceive the “atman.”
SUTRA 42   Perfecting the “niyamā” of happiness (“santosha”) creates a supreme sublime bliss in the yogi.
SUTRA 43   Austerity (“tapas”) eliminates impurities and leads to the superhuman development of the senses.
SUTRA 44   “Svādhyāya” leads to feeling a connection to a Beloved form of the Divine.
SUTRA 45   Devotion to the Divine (“Īśvara pranidhānā”) leads to mastery of “samādhi.”
SUTRA 46   “Āsana” is a physical posture that is comfortable.
SUTRA 47   “Āsana” is perfected when there is no more effort and the mind is absorbed into the Infinite.
SUTRA 48   Perfection in “āsana” leads to forbearance with all dualities.
SUTRA 49   When “āsana” is perfected, the yogi controls the in and the out breath (“prānāyāma).
SUTRA 50   In observing the breath as it cycles externally, internally and stopped, based on location, time and count, it becomes drawn out and subtle.
SUTRA 51   The fourth stage (“prānāyāma”) occurs when all internal and external reference has ended.
SUTRA 52   Then the veil that covers the inner light falls away.
SUTRA 53   As a result the mind becomes concentrated and fit.
SUTRA 54   The senses then disconnect from their objects (in “pratyāhāra”) as the mind starts to resemble its own essential nature.
SUTRA 55  “Pratyāhāra” thus produces the supreme mastery of the senses.

BOOK 3

BOOK 4

Links to KILAYA’S BOOKS:

THE BHAGAVAD GITA IN FOCUS: A Comparison of 35 English Translations
THE SCORPIO RING OF FIRE: An Astrological Journey into the Heart of the Galactic Center
LOVE IS IN MY MOTHER, THE MOON: Poems from Amritapuri, India

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast June 18, 2022 on the Black Moon Lillith

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed astronomical quirks between the Earth and the Moon, specifically the Black Moon Lillith otherwise known as the Moon’s apogee and perigee which are responsible for the SuperMoons. I share my theory that the unusual motion of the Moon in relation to the Earth represents the upredicability of our day to day mood swings and the Black Moon Lillith in a personal chart shows a central issue that will always be characterized by chaos and unpredictable changes.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-june-18-2022-the-black-moon-other-points

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast May 14, 2022 on the Santa Fe Horoscope Astrology Chart

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed the horoscope for the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico with an eye on the next 10 years.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-may-14-2022-horoscope-for-santa-fe-nm

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast April 9, 2022 on Jupiter Neptune Conjunction

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed the conjunction of Jupiter and Neptune on April 12th

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-april-9-2022-jupiter-neptune

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast March 19, 2022 on the Galactic Center’s Influence

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed more about the galactic center of the Milky Way and the zodiac ages of Pisces and Aquarius.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-march-19-2022-galactic-center

Uranus Speaking

Age of Aquarius Ruler

As the ruling planet of the up and coming Age of Aquarius Uranus is particularly relevant to understanding our world today. I would like to add a few tidbits of insight on this planet to the description that you can readily read in any Astrology textbook. These insights are like downloads or, if you’re a little more mystical, like channeled monologues coming from the planet itself. So with the utmost respect and reverence in mind I have a few points I would like to share.

Most people think that Uranus was discovered in the 1700’s and so, was not present astrologically prior to that. My research into Plato’s writings, however, have turned up a different story. For Plato and his main speaker, Socrates, Uranus was the Greek word that represented not only a god but also the entirety of the Universe. In Plato’s description of the Universe in both “Epinomis” and in “Timaes” the planets are listed as successive spheres that surround the Earth like layers of an onion. In that model there are eight such spheres with the outer-most, the eighth, called “Ouranos” in Greek. Scholars have traditionally interpreted “Ouranos” as meaning “the Heavens” or the night sky itself and so, in that way, it signifies the space or background in which all the stars and planets dwell. But Uranus would like to state that this interpretation is half the story at best. As Plato teaches elsewhere, the Greek god, “Ouranos,” had two aspects. One, he was a god in himself, the father of Kronos and grandfather of Zeus. And two, he was Olympia, itself. In other words, Uranus is not only a singular god amongst gods but at the same time he was/is the space in which all the gods dwell: Olympia. This means not only that Uranus, as a planet, so to speak, was known to the ancient Greeks but also that our current astrological understanding of Uranus falls short of his entirety.

Uranus, then, was the first appearance of monotheism in the Western world. Even the god of the Hebrews didn’t claim to include within Himself all the other gods. But that is what Uranus was for the Greeks. He was the god that was also the space in which all other gods (and lower creatures as well) dwelt. He represents the very idea of Divinity, of the Divine, as a singular property. Uranus is therefore the impetus to monotheism which today is wrongly, I believe, ascribed to Neptune (and Uranus is not happy about that). Neptune represents the mystical experience which we then interpret through the monotheistic filter (for most people anyway). We would not interpret such a transcendental Neptunian experience without the help of conceptual Uranus.

Another way of describing this new and profound perspective on Uranus is to say that Uranus is not only the eighth planet but also represents all of the visible Universe. And so, astrologically, we should interpret Uranus as indicating all of the visible universe; that is, everything that can be perceived falls within Uranus’s purview. Taking this one step further, which may be too fast of a progression for this short discourse, Uranus represents the mind’s capacity to perceive, period; the capacity to think and consider. Because all of the Universe exists due to the mind’s capacity to perceive it. I’m not implying something philosophically debatable (that an object’s existence depends on the mind) but simply that we only know the “reality” of the universe only through the mind’s filter and capacity. The limitations in that filter and capacity is the domain of Uranus. So what is beyond Uranus, the sphere of Neptune and Pluto, principally, is beyond the capacity of the thinking/perceiving mind. Of course, it is not so easy to conceive of what that might be.

Another quality helpful in understanding Uranus is his nature as the sky. When we look up either by night or day we are communing with Uranus. And the properties of the sky reflect that. The sky is truly democratic which is another domain owned by Uranus. It is democratic because both the rich and the poor, the educated and the uneducated, can equally partake of the sky wherever they are. Poor people may not have windows but they can always simply step outside to appreciate the sky. Rich people however get beautiful landscapes to view, living by lakes or at the foot of mountains. However, rich people can’t get any more of the sky than anyone else. It is truly democratically distributed.

The internet is the same way. It is also a domain owned and governed by Uranus and it is also quickly becoming equally distributed and accessible to the rich and poor across the globe. Global travelers will attest to the fact that poor people around the world have smart phones even when they don’t have a toilet in their house. And ironically, smart phones all around the world have comparable download speeds no matter where you go. When I go to India I am able to watch videos and listen to music with equal ease there than back home in the US. The internet seems to be widely distributed and treats people fairly equally. And that is increasingly true every year.

The last aspect of Uranus I feel prompted to share here concerns impulses. Uranus rules the most basic of all our impulses: our thoughts. We may have many complicated behavioral patterns that could be called impulsive or instinctual (which are the Moon’s domain) but Uranus rules the impulses behind the way that we perceive the world and ourselves. It represents the flighty nature of our minds, the way it veers and dips and falls and jumps and starts all over in a new direction. Our minds are truly like the winds but because they are ruled by Uranus they are not only chaotic, unpredictable but also impulsive. What I mean by impulsive is that the way we think, although difficult to follow and map out, is ruled by the deepest seated impulses that are very resistant to being seen. The patterns that govern our thoughts are invisible like the air or the wind.

We interpret our sense data and compile a picture of ourselves and the environment we’re in very fast but not randomly or chaotically. In fact the way that we compute our sensorial inputs is very fixed and resistant to being seen not to mention resistant to changing. Therefore, the way we think, the patterns that they form, is the last thing we see and the last thing we are willing to question and review. I am thinking specifically about what we consider to be important and what not. The map or guidebook to those considerations is ruled by Uranus and so, automatically asserts itself in our moment to moment lives and is NOT open to review by our conscious minds. The upshot of this (one of many upshots actually) is that people today, and more so in the future, are not willing to question their own sense of being right. We inherently trust the mechanics of how our brains assess value. Thus, we think impulsively.

The willingness to trust our impulses in assessing value in ourselves and in others is increasing under Uranus’s influence so that there is less willingness to be criticized or be questioned by others today. In a very democratic sense, under this influence, we feel that we have an inalienable right to our own point of view and to live according to it exclusively. I am describing an increase in individualism hidden under a democratic “live and let live” slogan. This is all ascribable to that gas giant in the sky, Uranus, who is slowly taking over from Neptune as our dominant global influence.

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast April 9, 2022 on the Jupiter Neptune Conjunction.

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed the conjunction of Jupiter and Neptune on April 12th, 2022.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-april-9-2022-jupiter-neptune

Radio KSFR Moonwise Podcast March 12, 2022 on the Galactic Center’s Influence

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I discussed the influence of Scorpio and Sagittarius at the center of the Milky Way.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-march-12-2022-galactic-center

Radio Moonwise Podcast Part 2: Environmental Degradation. Feb 12, 2022

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program again: KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I continued a conversation on the relationship of the zodiac sign Scorpio to the Earth’s climate crisis this time specifically about Scorpio symbols and archetypes related to change. This is second in a series. We chatted about tidbits of interesting astrological knowledge related to Scorpio and the inner journey that it demands.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

Moonwise February 12, 2022 Scorpio & Climate Change

Radio Moonwise Podcast re: Environmental Degradation.

Merrylin LeBlanc was kind enough to invite me onto her wonderful New Mexico public radio program, KSFR program “Moonwise.” Merrylin and I began a conversation on the relationship of the zodiac sign Scorpio to the Earth’s climate crisis. This is the first in a series. More will follow probably on a monthly basis. We chatted about tidbits of interesting astrological knowledge related to Scorpio and the inner journey that it demands.

Cheers to public radio and it’s distribution on the web.

https://moonwise.libsyn.com/moonwise-january-22-2022-climate-crisis-through-the-lens-of-scorpio-with-kilaya-ciriello